backlight (by flora-file) HD

backlight (by flora-file)

black pearl (by flora-file)

lantana (by flora-file) HD

lantana (by flora-file)

semper vi (by flora-file) HD

semper vi (by flora-file)

namaste (by flora-file) HD

namaste (by flora-file)

donkey tail spurge (by flora-file) HD

donkey tail spurge (by flora-file)

half mast (by flora-file) HD

half mast (by flora-file)

pink breath of heaven (by flora-file) HD

pink breath of heaven (by flora-file)

divinity (by flora-file) HD

divinity (by flora-file)

semper sea (by flora-file) HD

semper sea (by flora-file)

ruthbancroftgarden:

Until recently, Nolina was placed in the family Nolinaceae, along with Beaucarnea (Pony-tail Palm), Dasylirion (Sotol) and Calibanus. The new arrangement sweeps up a whole bunch of former families into a greatly enlarged Asparagaceae, including the Agavaceae and the Nolinaceae, so that these former families are now classed as subfamilies. With this system, Nolina is in the subfamily Nolinoideae within the Asparagaceae, but the new subfamily is exactly the same as the old Nolina family. All species in the Nolinoideae/Nolinaceae have separate male and female plants, though it normally is not possible to tell which is which until they flower. The plant pictured is a female specimen of Nolina matapensis, native to northwestern Mexico. It is at the stage where the seed capsules are developing, and the flower plume is still quite full; if it were a male plant, there would be no capsules present, and the inflorescence would look sparse and threadbare by now. N. matapensis is one of the large species which form trunks in time, but the long leaves and the thatch of the old leaves keep the trunk hidden from view until the plant is quite old (the plant pictured is now about 10 feet tall - not counting the flower stalk - and was planted in 1976 as a 3-year-old seedling).
-Brian
HD

ruthbancroftgarden:

Until recently, Nolina was placed in the family Nolinaceae, along with Beaucarnea (Pony-tail Palm), Dasylirion (Sotol) and Calibanus. The new arrangement sweeps up a whole bunch of former families into a greatly enlarged Asparagaceae, including the Agavaceae and the Nolinaceae, so that these former families are now classed as subfamilies. With this system, Nolina is in the subfamily Nolinoideae within the Asparagaceae, but the new subfamily is exactly the same as the old Nolina family. All species in the Nolinoideae/Nolinaceae have separate male and female plants, though it normally is not possible to tell which is which until they flower. The plant pictured is a female specimen of Nolina matapensis, native to northwestern Mexico. It is at the stage where the seed capsules are developing, and the flower plume is still quite full; if it were a male plant, there would be no capsules present, and the inflorescence would look sparse and threadbare by now. N. matapensis is one of the large species which form trunks in time, but the long leaves and the thatch of the old leaves keep the trunk hidden from view until the plant is quite old (the plant pictured is now about 10 feet tall - not counting the flower stalk - and was planted in 1976 as a 3-year-old seedling).

-Brian

Aloes (by flora-file)

massive colorful crassula (by flora-file) HD

massive colorful crassula (by flora-file)

faded (by flora-file) HD

faded (by flora-file)

Alyogyne (by flora-file) HD

Alyogyne (by flora-file)

Up